10 Minute Miso Soup

Before getting into this super quick and easy, heart-warming soup, you may have noticed something different about the blog. Just a little something. I changed the design! Being the indecisive person I am it took me forever to find one that I liked. I didn’t know if I wanted to go minimalistic or bold. As you can see, I went down the minimalistic route. I loved the look of the dark and bold designs but, I felt like it didn’t really reflect me. I’m not really the one to be super bold. So here it is, a simple and clear layout.

Okay, now on to what you really came here for. Miso soup!

Japanese cuisine is one of my favorite. Although I don’t eat sashimi (basically anything raw), I love everything else from sushi to tempura, ramen and udon! When going to any Japanese restaurant, miso soup is something that has to be ordered.

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It’s warm and comforting and just perfects with a bit of tofu and seaweed in every mouthful. Up until now, I’ve always drank miso soup when eating out. But now with this 10 minute miso soup recipe, it’s available whenever I want. I actually made this for my Japanese inspired dinner. If you haven’t seen it go check out my Grilled Salmon Onigri.

Miso is usually made with a dashi base, a cooking stop made from kombu (dried kelp), katsuobushi (dried and smoked fish which has been shaved into flakes, bonito flakes). Since these ingredients aren’t technically the easiest to your hand on, using instant dashi granules will do just the job. It wasn’t really hard for me to find since I live in Asia but if you’re living in the west, I’d assume you’d find this in Asian grocery stores. Same goes for the miso. Not a lot of miso goes into the pot so it may seem like you’re never going to use it up. But miso is actually quite versatile and can be used in many recipe including salad dressings, marinades and many other Asian-inspired dishes. To me, it’s a worthy addition to the pantry.

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When buying miso you’ll probably run into two types: red and white. Red miso is stronger in flavor and saltier. For this recipe, I chose white miso which I personally think makes the soup more appetizing. If you’ve got red miso on hand you can definitely use that but adjust the amount you add as red miso is stronger in taste.

This soup bursts with miso flavor and has just the right amount of tofu to seaweed in every spoonful. Use soft tofu and you’ll have a silky texture with each bite. As for the seaweed, it is usually sold dry. Before cooking the soup, rehydrate it in some water for about 10 minutes. Remember, a little goes a long way because they will expand after being rehydrated. Trust me, I know. I made this mistake the first time and I ended up with an over flowing bowl of seaweed!

Ingredients

  • 8 cups Water
  • 1 1/2 tsp Instant Dashi Granules
  • 1/4 cup Miso Paste
  • 1 tbsp Dried Seaweed, soaked in water
  • 1/2 cup Cubed Soft Tofu
  • 2 tbsp Chopped Green Onion

Directions 

  1. Pour water into a pot and bring to a boil. Add the instant dashi granules and whisk until dissolved.
  2. Turn the heat to medium-low and add the tofu. Then drain the seaweed and add it to the pot. Simmer for 2 minutes.
  3. Spoon the miso paste into a bowl and ladle about 1/2 cup of hot dashi broth and whisk until mixed and the miso paste it melted. Make sure the mixture is smooth to prevent the miso from clumping in the pot.
  4. Turn off the heat and add the miso mixture and stir well. Taste and add more miso paste if desired. Top with green onions and serve.

 

Author: Nicole

Hello! My name is Nicole and I’m a home baker and the occasional chef for the family. Starting with pre-mix cake boxes and now baking everything from scratch, I spend most of my time day dreaming about the numerous things I could be baking. I’m definitely the one who has the biggest sweet tooth! Along with my passion in the culinary world, I love sharing all the delicious creations I’ve made! I hope you enjoy my recipes and give it a try yourself!

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